Poyet Scorecard

The long standing favourite for the job, Gus Poyet is under the microscope. Samantha, editor for Vital Brighton, gives us her verdict on Brighton & Hove Albion’s former boss, starting with her opinion around his mysterious departure.

by GMac88 Sunday, 06 October 2013 02:56 PM Comments

The long standing favourite for the job, Gus Poyet is under the microscope. Samantha, editor for Vital Brighton, gives us her verdict on Brighton & Hove Albion’s former boss, starting with her opinion around his mysterious departure.

For much of last season Poyet had been touting himself for vacant Premiership jobs and constantly went on about the Albion having reached their ceiling with where he could take us. He whined about the supporters if we lost even though we had full houses and (if you came down to the Amex when we beat you in the cup!) the noise there is terrific.

He only turned down Reading because he knew they were going down.

The real final nail in the coffin was the play off semi-final against the scum, sorry Crystal Palace; having beating them 3-0 at home a month or two earlier, because he knew he was going , he changed the team around that easily beat them and they were TOTALLY unmotivated because apparently he had already told the players he was leaving. At the final whistle both he and Taricco just disappeared into the stands, not a wave, not a thank you nothing.  He then refused, according to reports, to sort out players contracts, something that was his job.

By the end of this everyone was pleased that he was suspended because he had thrown his toys out of the pram once too often. His smile hides a determination to do what's right for him, not for the club. With no offence intended, I'm sure he would still see Sunderland as a small club and he will use them as a stepping stone to try and end up at Chelsea or Tottenham, as quickly and sneakily as possible.

Tactical Nous – 6

Tactically Poyet likes to have his team control the game, to starve the opposition of the ball, this means plenty of passing across the back, plenty of probing and back again if there are no openings. You will never see your defence or keeper play a long ball, even if it means putting the team under pressure if being pressed. When the side click and play football they shift the ball quickly and usually make their chances by getting their wingers into the game.

He very much loathes to make early substitutions and can be very negative if the team go 1-0 up. You will need a very good defence that are ball players and don't bother having a target man as he doesn't have a plan 'b'.

Man Management – 7

This is something where there are differing reports, our star midfielder a while ago, Vicente, was quoted as saying he was the worst manager that he had worked for and that he took the micky out of players who missed shots in training. In contrast Wayne Bridge felt that he was one of the best managers he had played under.

What was said a lot is that plenty of the squad felt they learned a lot from him and his relaxed demeanour probably helps the players to relax.

Youth Management – 4

Never really wanted to give the youngsters a chance, this is in stark contrast to our new boss. Maybe Jake Forster-Caskey was the exception but after playing a couple of good games he was consigned to the DS as soon as the injured player returned.

You rarely heard him talk about the young players unlike Oscar who sees them as very important to the club.

Discipline – 8

I don't think Poyet suffers fools gladly and will not do an Alex Ferguson and back his players whatever. He says it as he sees it, rightly or wrongly.

Whether he will be able to control the strong personalities that the Premiership brings with it is another thing as he is very confrontational which can be good or bad depending on the player and the situation.

How good a fit is he for Sunderland – 5

Personally I think not, Poyet needs a team like Arsenal who are used to keeping the ball and like a slow patient build up. I believe he will take Sunderland down trying to play his way but if given the backing could bring them up again within two seasons once he has assembled a side with the type of players he wants.

Overall score: 30/50

Closer to the mark than Tony Pulis certainly, but brings a worrying cloud of doubt along with him. A lot of Sam’s points remind me a great deal of Paolo Di Canio though perhaps on a less extreme scale. He definitely represents a risk but I am happy with the outcome Poyet over Pulis personally. Perhaps the real solution is away from them both.

 

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